Negotiation, Communication and
Body Language Strategies

“How To Use ‘Aim High’ Strategy In Negotiations” – Negotiation Infographic Tip

 

Aiming high in life and negotiations will allow you to achieve more from your efforts. This Negotiation Infographic Tip shows a few ways to use the concept of aiming high as a negotiation strategy.

How To Use Aim High Strategy In Negotiations

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Negotiation Infographic Tip and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Where’s Your Success” – Sunday Negotiation Insight

 

 

Sunday Negotiation Insight”

 

“Don’t define success by yesterday’s standards, you’re no longer there. Learn from ‘yesterday’ but live for today, and in so doing, prepare for the success that you’ll achieve tomorrow.” -Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Where is Your Success 

 

“Where’s Your Success”

 

Where’s your success? Do you know what it looks like? If you don’t define what success is and means for and to you. If you don’t, you won’t recognize when you achieve it, if you achieve it, nor what to do with it once you have. It will be akin to vapors of familiarity that tugs at your mind like a distant memory of what could or might have been.

In your definition of success, use your senses to assemble exactly what it means to and for you. Understand also that success is not a destination, it’s a journey; you should always strive to become more successful, no matter how successful you are.

Viewing success as a journey means that you’ll encounter obstacles. Some of those obstacles will require that you take detours. Preparing for those detours will ensure that you’re able to continue upon the road of success. Don’t let such obstacles detour you from your journey, view the obstacles as points upon which to enhance yourself as a person.

Once you identify what success looks like for you, along with its meaning, plot your course upon which you’ll travel to become successful. By doing so you’ll also increase the probability that you will become even more successful … and everything will be right with the world.

 

What does this have to do with negotiations?

 

Success, as defined by the outcome of a negotiation takes on the perception of each negotiator. Thus, in a negotiation, you should always seek to understand what success looks like for the other negotiator, while defining the outcome of what you’ll deem a successful negotiation. In a negotiation, success might be defined as recognizing an impasse that requires more time than you’re willing to commit, or any other aspect(s). As such, you must be adaptable during the negotiation, while at the same time using your plans to move from one phase of the negotiation to the next successfully.

The point is, when negotiating, always have a plan in place that consists of multiple strategies that you’ll use to achieve the level of success you seek from the negotiation. Having such a plan will allow you to function more efficiently and reduce the otherwise level of stress you might encounter in the negotiation. That will lead to a more successful negotiation outcome.

 

What are your thoughts? I’d really like to know. Reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating. 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Sunday Message of Hope and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“How to Concede To Get The Greatest Negotiation Impact” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

Negotiation Tip of the Week

 

“He who concedes too quickly is prone to give up too much.” – Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

How to Concede To Get The Greatest Negotiation Impact

 

“How to Concede To Get The Greatest Negotiation Impact”

 

 

How do you concede to get the greatest impact when negotiating? Do you concede quickly, or do you concede based on the flow of the negotiation? The latter should be the answer, and you should never concede without giving thought to where such action will lead.

The following are thoughts to consider before conceding in a negotiation.

 

Should you get something when conceding?

Some negotiators believe you should receive something for every concession you make. It sends a message to the other negotiator that he’ll have to give something to get something. If you subscribe to that theory, the question becomes, at what point do you ‘get something’? Should you do so at the time of the concession, or let your concessions accumulate, before cashing in your chits? The timing of your actions should be based on the flow of the negotiation and the style of the negotiator you’re negotiating with. That’s to say, if you’re negotiating with a negotiator that has a hard style of negotiating (i.e. I win, you lose), extract a toll for every concession you make. You’ll signal that you’re not a pushover, while indicating that he’ll have to earn what you give him. If you’re negotiating with a negotiator that has an easy style of negotiating (i.e. go along to get along), you can let your concessions accumulate. You’ll build trust with this type of negotiator. Just make sure that he reciprocates appropriately when you seek a concession. If he doesn’t, revert to a one-for-one ratio (i.e. get every time you give).

 

How to use numbers to influence concessions.

Quick, in three seconds, what’s the dollar difference between $2,100 and $1,990. At first glance, did it seem larger than $110? Therein lies the impact that non-round numbers can have on the perception of value. When negotiating, odd numbers, such as $1,990 versus $2,000, can have a profound effect on the mind of the person viewing the offer. The former sends the subliminal message that there may not be a lot of room to move past that offer. When making concessions, consider how you can influence the perception of your offers and counteroffers based on the numbers you use.

 

Think about how your concession will be perceived.

Understand how your concessions might be perceived before issuing them. Depending on the style of a negotiator (i.e. hard, easy, closed, open), what the easy/open negotiator might perceive as an attempt to further the negotiation, the hard/closed negotiator might perceive as an opportunity to take advantage of you.

 

How to use Red Herrings when conceding.

Red herrings can be irrelevant or relevant information. They can be used to divert attention from something you don’t wish to discuss, and they can also be used to project perceived value. In the latter case, use red herrings in the form of something that appears to have value to you that the opposing negotiator views as having real value to him; the stronger his perception of real value, the greater the value the red herring will be for him. At a point when you’ve been requested to make a concession, after great consternation, you can reluctantly give him the red herring. You will have lost nothing of real value, but you will have gained another chit that you can use later.

 

As you can see, there’s a lot of gamesmanship that occurs in a negotiation. You can enhance the probability of winning the game by utilizing the insights above … and everything will be right with the world.

 

What are your thoughts? I’d really like to know. Reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Who Said You Can’t?” – Negotiation Infographic Tip

The thoughts of others add or detract value from your thoughts … only to the degree that you allow them to. When someone tells you that you can’t achieve the desired outcome, a goal, question them as to why they think that’s so. If you give their sentiments validity, question yourself as to why you’re thinking in such a manner.

The point is, everyone is influenced by outside stimuli, but we’re driven by our internal thoughts. Protect the thoughts that motivate you to move ahead. don’t be deterred by the naysayers. The thoughts that promote a ‘can do’ attitude in you will be the guides that lead you to more winning negotiation outcomes.

 

Who Said You Cant

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Negotiation Infographic Tip and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Do You Know Me, Now?” – Sunday Negotiation Insight

Sunday Negotiation Insight”

 

“To be your true self, only you can define who you are.” -Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Do you know me now

 

“Do You Know Me, Now?”

 

Who are you? You’re not the person that you use to be. When others attempt to define you, ask them … Do you know me? Do you know who I really am? I’m not the person that you knew yesterday. That person is gone. I’m not the person that you’ll know tomorrow. That person is still being created. I’m the person that you see before you, right now. I’m full of wonderment, wisdom, and surprise. The person that you see now is the sum of my past personas. Just because you can’t see my current persona doesn’t mean it’s not there.

I am who I am because I choose to be that person. I’ll only accept your opinion of me to the degree that it serves me. Thus, you cannot tell me that I’m not good enough. You cannot point out my shortcomings and expect me to accept it as my reality. You cannot tell me that I won’t be successful. Only I can define me, and who I was yesterday is no longer who I am today. Look at me! I’ve grown since yesterday and I’ll grow again today. Watch me, because I’ll do so again tomorrow. Look at me, I’m new and I’m different than I was before. If need be, I’ll tell you the same tomorrow.

 

What does this have to do with negotiations?

 

Every negotiation is different than the last, even when it’s with the same person. Be mindful of those that would seek to disadvantage you, due to their assignment of your value. If such assessment doesn’t serve you, disavow it.

Some negotiators will try to take advantage of you. That is, until you show them that you’re no longer the person that they took advantage of in the past. You can reshape your persona and cast a different impression of yourself anytime you choose to. So, choose to be the person that you wish to become and project the persona that serves you best when negotiating. Remember, in persona, the word ‘person’ exist. Be the person you choose to be when it’s that persona that serves you best … and everything will be right with the world.

 

What’s your opinion? I’d really like to know. Reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Sunday Message of Hope and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“How To Use Good Questions To Win More Negotiations” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

“A well-placed question can put you on the road to success. A well-placed question posed at the appropriate time can make success your servant.” – Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

How To Use Good Questions To Win More Negotiations

 

What thought do you give to the questions you’ll ask during a negotiation? Do you consider how you’ll deliver the questions and the impact that will have on how the question is perceived? Good questions, posed at the appropriate time in a negotiation, can be the teller that determines if a negotiation will be successful or a dud.

 

You can definitely win more negotiations by posing the following informational gathering and insightful questions.

 

Why would I do that? (The response gives you insight into the other negotiator’s thoughts as to why the point/deal offering should be perceived as beneficial to you. You can use the point against him by asking if he’d accept it. If there’s equity in it, that will also give you insight into where he is mentally and physically (i.e. starting to possibly tire of the negotiation or revving up).

What would you ask to get more information? (Gather insight, and possibly new ideas, about what else can be done to overcome an impasse and/or advance the negotiation)

How can we make this a win/win outcome? (This gives you insight per what he perceives to be a winning outcome for both of you and allows you to glimpse the direction he’d like to see the negotiation take.)

What part of the story/offer needs to be clearer? (Seeking his specific perspective and understanding of what’s been discussed that my need clarification)

Where does your keen interest lie? (This question can be used when you’re being questioned and want to take control of the negotiation – the person asking the questions is the person in control of the negotiation.)

What deal would you want me to offer you that I would accept? (This is a very powerful question because it calls into play the sense of fairness. The response will also give you a sense of how fair the other negotiator is, or is willing to appear.)

 

To add power to the delivery of your question(s), display the appropriate effect to make it more impactful (i.e. wincing, speaking faster/slower, learning forward/backward, etc.) Such nonverbal cues will add more meaning to your words. Also, when posing such questions, if the opposing negotiator is slow to respond, wait! That could mean he’s going deeper into thought mode. If you sense he’s having an ‘aha moment’, dig deeper. Ask him what thoughts came from your question, or what thought(s) he just had. Sensing such nonverbal gestures is where reading body language enhances your negotiation efforts. The point is, when an ‘aha moment’ occurs take note of the body language emitted at that time. As additional insight, leaning away can imply moving away from the question to give it deeper thought, while leaning forward can give insight that he’s ready to address the question head-on. In any case, note what the body language was prior to the question (i.e. relaxed, stern, contemplating, etc.), and what became of it after his response.

 

While some questions can be used to obfuscate the opposing negotiator, be careful when doing so. There are times when the appearance of your superiority is appropriate and other times when such will appear to be ‘speaking down to someone’. Know the difference, based on the circumstances at that time, when it’s appropriate to use questions that position you in one stance versus another. The point is, make sure such position serves you …  and everything will be right with the world.

 

 

What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear them. You can reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Winning Negotiation Processes” – Negotiation Infographic Tip

 

Negotiating without a process is like crossing the Atlantic Ocean in a rowboat. Worse, it’s like doing so without oars!

To enhance the probability of winning more negotiations, consider implementing the thoughts in this week’s Negotiation Infographic Tip into your negotiation process.

 

Winning Negotiation Processes

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Negotiation Infographic Tip and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Whose Reflection Is In The Mirror” – Sunday Negotiation Insight

“The reflection you see in the mirror is the person you created and continue to create. Create the person that serves you best.”  -Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Whose Reflection Is In The Mirror

 

“Whose Reflection Is In The Mirror”

 

When you look in the mirror what do you see? Do you see someone smart, not so smart, fat, thin, courageous, or fearful? Those are important questions because the way you see yourself is the way you may project yourself to others.

Our self-perspective is used as a gauge that indicates how deeply we’ll engage in an environment. As an example, if you think others in an environment are smarter than you, you might be somewhat reserved when speaking-up or engaging. Doing that may limit your opportunities.

When you look in the mirror, remember, you’re the person shaping the image you see. A mirror image is what you see one moment, and that image will change, even if it’s slight, the next moment. You’re always seeing something that’s different about yourself when you look in the mirror. That means, with courage if such is required, you can shape and mold that image to be whatever you wish. If you’re looking at reality one moment and that reality changes the next moment, might you shape reality to serve you better? Don’t hesitate with your response. The answer is yes.

Since you’re in control of your life, control it. Shape it, make it, and take it to any level you choose, because you do so anyway. Recognize that you have all the control you need to make that person in the mirror into whatever you wish … and everything will be right with the world.

 

What does this have to do with negotiations?

 

The way you project yourself through words and body language, allows others to assess your nature, the kind of person you are. In a negotiation, you have to project the right image. If you appear too meek, the other negotiator may attempt to take advantage of you. If you’re too forceful, you may be perceived as being overbearing. It all comes back to the image you see in the mirror. Practice being who and what you want to be. Do so for different situations and you’ll be more competent in those situations.

 

What’s your opinion? I’d really like to know. Reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Sunday Message of Hope and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Trump-Comey To Negotiate Better Focus On The Mind” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

 

“In order to negotiate better, you must enhance your ability to focus on the known and even more so on the unknown.” -Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

To Negotiate Better Focus On The Mind

 

“Trump-Comey To Negotiate Better Focus On The Mind”

 

President Trump should have considered how former FBI Director Comey thinks before engaging in the latest round of negotiations (You’re always negotiating!). To negotiate better, always consider the mindset of the other negotiator. Doing so will allow you to focus better on the appropriate negotiation strategy.

Who is he? What does he focus on when negotiating? Those are just a few questions that you should ask yourself every time you enter into negotiation. Such questions help you to hone in on the mind of the other negotiator. It causes you to focus on how he thinks, which will give you insight into what he might do during the negotiation.

I wonder if the president was aware of posing such questions to himself when thinking about how he’d deal (negotiate) with former FBI Director Comey.

Questions like, who is he, what mindset does he possess, and what is that mindset based on, may appear to be so benign to one’s thought process that such questions don’t get the well-deserved recognition that should be afforded them. Had the president pondered such questions in more depth, he might have adopted a different posture in dealing with Comey.

 

Here’s another point to consider when thinking about the way the other negotiator thinks. When you’re negotiating with someone or a group of people, you’re not just negotiating with them, you’re also negotiating with those not at the negotiation table. Pause! Depending on your negotiation skill level, you may have just thought or said to yourself, I know that. Here’s the point and it’s also the intent of this article, think deeper! If you thought my statement about considering how the other negotiator thinks, related to who is not at the negotiation table that has a stake in the negotiation, you’re right, half right.

The ‘think deeper’ aspect means to think about the people your negotiation counterpart has negotiated with in the past. Those encounters have helped shape his opinions, his sense of perception, his tolerance for risk, in essence, they will have helped shape his mind and his thought process. All of that will impact and determine how he negotiates with you.

When President Trump took on former FBI Director Comey, it appears the president did not consider the long-standing practices and processes that the former director engaged in throughout his career. Such processes like documenting what occurred in meetings (which left paper trails), and having practiced with many bureaucrats throughout his career should have given the president cause to think deeper about his attempts to sway Comey’s opinions one way or the other. Instead, some say, the president attempted to use bullying tactics cloaked in veil threats (e.g. he (Comey) better hope there are not tapes), in an attempt to get his way. Based on the tactics the president has used in the past, it’s assumed he thought they’d work again.

When negotiating, always consider the totality of the other negotiator’s mind. You may not know everything that went into the makeup of the mindset he possesses but the more you do know, the better your chances will be at crafting a winning negotiation strategy … and everything will be right with the world.

 

What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear them. You can reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Limiting Beliefs Limit Your Beliefs” – Sunday Negotiation Insight

 

“The way you think determines how you think. Don’t limit your thoughts by having limiting beliefs.”  -Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Limiting Beliefs Limit Your Beliefs

“Limiting Beliefs Limit Your Beliefs”

 

How many times have you said to yourself, I can’t do that? Seriously, consider the times in your life when you posed such a question. Then, think about the times you did so and what that thought was related to (e.g. I can’t lose weight, I can’t become better at ‘x’, etc.)

The point is, when you have limiting beliefs, you limit your ability to achieve more and be more than what you are. Worse, limiting beliefs allows you to mentally prepare to accept a less than stellar attempt at achieving success.

When you hear it, take note of the little voice in your head that says, “I can’t”. As soon as it attempts to dissuade you from attempting to conquer what you want to achieve, talk back to it. Ask it, why can’t I achieve ‘x’? What are you attempting to do with the words, “I can’t”? What thoughts do I need to change to have a more positive perspective about this effort?

Some people associate one talking to one’s self as a slipping of the mind. I believe the exact opposite. Since we’re always having conversations with our self, we should be mindful of controlling those conversations. After all, what we think we can achieve is viewed through the prism of what we perceive to be achievable. Thus, if you shift your paradigm to one of, “I can”, instead of, “I can’t”, you’ll be better positioned mentally to strive harder towards greater achievements … and everything will be right with the world.

 

What does this have to do with negotiations?

 

As soon as you adopt an “I can’t” attitude at the negotiation table, you set yourself up for a ‘less than’ outcome in the negotiation. By maintaining a more positive perspective about what you can achieve, you’ll place more focus on a greater outcome. Since there’s a lot of psychological gamesmanship that occurs during a negotiation, you have to keep your mental state sharp. Focusing on the, “I can” and not limiting your beliefs, is a way to do so.

 

What’s your opinion? I’d really like to know. Reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Sunday Message of Hope and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,