Latest "Micro Expressions" Posts

“Guaranteed Body Language Secrets That Will Win More Negotiations” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

 

Negotiation Tip of the Week

 

“A person’s body language displays gestures that conceal hidden thoughts. The ability to read body language allows one to see those hidden thoughts.” -Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Guaranteed Body Language SecretsThat Will Win More Negotiations

 

“Guaranteed Body Language Secrets

That Will Win More Negotiations”

 

When negotiating, do you consider the impact that body language secrets have on the negotiation? Body language secrets are like silent whispers shaping the flow of the negotiation. Studies have indicated that up to 85% of one’s communication is conveyed via body language. That means a lot of your communications occurs through your body language, not just your words.

To discover how you can win more negotiations, observe the following body language gestures in your negotiations.

 

Sense of awareness:

When negotiating, raise your sense of awareness about the gestures made during the negotiation. Such observation will give you a sense of direction for the negotiation. Make sure you pay close attention to signs that are missing that should have been made (e.g. a negotiator that states he can’t accept your deal while appearing to be a bit too happy). If anything appears to differ between someone’s words and their body gestures, lend more credence to their body gestures. Those gestures will be more reflective of the person’s real sentiments.

 

What to observe:

A few body language signals to observe are:

  • Hand gestures: Take note to whether the hands are open or closed when discussing offers. If the topic is about receiving or giving something and hands are open, there’s more mental favorability associated with the topic than if the hands are closed. Closed hands are a sign indicating doubt about the benefit(s) of what one’s saying or hearing.

 

 

  • Facial features:
    • Corner of lip turned upwards – This gesture is conveying contempt for what’s being discussed. The gesture may last for less than a second, which is why it’s important to watch for it.
    • Smiles – A smile can be used as a tool to disarm you in an attempt to make you feel better about the negotiation. A genuine smile is one displayed by both corners of the lips turned upward, a heightening of the cheekbone areas, and a glistening in the eyes. If any of those components are missing, the smile may lack the full conviction that the words are intended to convey.
    • Feet – Even if you’re seated, find a way to note the feet positioning of the other negotiator. The more aligned his feet are with yours, the more he’s engaged with you in the negotiation. Take note when his feet are no longer aligned with yours; that’s a sign of lower interest in what’s being discussed.

 

Nonverbal clues:    

  • Voice pitch and tonality: When a negotiator attempts to make a subject matter lighter, he will usually do so with an airier tone to his voice. Compare that to a deeper tonality to convey more seriousness about the subject matter being discussed. Thus, even the way someone says something (i.e. pitch, tone) alters the perception of those words. Always be mindful of that.

 

  • Clearing of throat: If you observe a negotiator continuously clearing his throat, drinking what’s an obsessive amount of water for the situation, and/or swallowing more than normal, he’s indicating nervousness. The nervousness could stem from the degree he wants to offer, the deal, etc. To assess why he’s performing this gesture take note when it occurs and when it’s absent. That will give you the needed insight to determine the degree of pressure to apply during the negotiation.

 

In your very next negotiation, observe and utilize the insights above. By doing so you’ll drastically increase the guarantee of enhancing your negotiation outcomes … and everything will be right with the world.

 

#HowToReadBodyLanguage  #HowToWinNegotiations #CSuite

 

What are your takeaways? I’d really like to know. Reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Whose Thoughts Are Controlling You” – Sunday Negotiation Insight

 

“Sunday Negotiation Insight”

 

“Be mindful of the thoughts you have that stem from others, especially if those thoughts don’t serve you.” – Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Whose Thoughts Are Controlling You

 

“Whose Thoughts Are Controlling You”

 

Be wary of those that deconstruct and then reconstruct reality to serve their purpose.

 

A standard practice in negotiations is to shape someone’s perspective. Actually, that occurs anytime in life when one person is attempting to get someone else to ‘see things their way’. There’s nothing inherently wrong with that. It’s the give and takes that occurs in any discussion. What you should be mindful of is why someone is attempting to get you to alter your perspective.

If someone purports something to be a certain way and you have an opposing opinion, understand the mental dynamics that are at play. Question if the person is trying to sway your point of view because he’s prioritizing a self-need to fulfill. If so, ask yourself what that need is and why he has the desire to fulfill it. Next, consider what he’ll do with your swayed perspective. That will inform you of how you fit into his equation.

Here’s the point. The better you can understand someone’s motive per the acts they engage in, especially when they’re attempting to alter your mind, the more understanding you’ll have about their source of motivation. That source will be the real reason behind their actions. Once you know that, you can determine if you want to go for a mental ride that they’re in control of or take a ride of your own. Either way, you’ll be in greater control of what happens to you … and everything will be right with the world.

 

What does this have to do with negotiations?

 

In negotiations, people present thoughts, ideas, and situations that support their objectives. They do so from their perspective of reality. They create it based on the way they construct, deconstruct, and then reconstruct situations they’ve experienced.

If you want to maintain and exercise more control in any negotiation, you must understand the process that someone has gone through to develop the mindset they possess. Once you understand where they’ve been, you can assess with more accuracy where they’re headed. Then, if you wish to go along because it behooves you to do so, you’ll do so because it fits into your plans. You’ll be looking out for yourself, knowing that you’re not blindly following someone else’s mandate.  That will allow you to be in greater control of yourself and the negotiation.

 

What are your takeaways? I’d really like to know. Reach me at Greg@TheMasterNegotiator.com

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Sunday Message of Hope and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“How To Read Body Language Better – Fear Versus Anger” – Negotiation Infographic Tip

 

When assessing genuine fear versus genuine anger, you should definitely know the difference. Not knowing the difference can lead to adopting the wrong strategy to deal with a situation as you’re negotiating. Worst case scenario, it could be the difference between life and death.

Observe the difference between fear and anger in the negotiation infographic tip.

 

How To Read Body Language Better  Fear Versus Anger

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Negotiation Infographic Tip and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Ultimate Danger and Agony of Negotiating Like Donald Trump” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

“Attempt to treat all people with respect. In so doing more people will respect you”. -Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Donald Trumps Negotiation Style Is Not For Everyone

 

“Ultimate Danger and Agony of Negotiating Like Donald Trump”

The intent of this article is to highlight the negotiation tactics used by Donald Trump. It doesn’t pass judgment on the man.

 

Some have called Donald Trump a negotiator’s negotiator when it comes to the art of the deal. Many have sought to emulate his tactics, but upon examination, one might be cautious to do so. That’s because one needs the resources that Mr. Trump has to sustain the type of negotiation ploys he employs. Take as an example the following …

 

Stating verifiable truths as untruths:

It’s very difficult to negotiate with someone that offers alternative facts to reality when making offers and counteroffers that you and they make. It’s akin to being in an environment where up is down, out is in, and right is wrong. Through such mental maneuverings, Mr. Trump leaves an opposing negotiator in a state of doubt per the direction to take in a negotiation.

 

I never promised you a rose garden:

Mr. Trump makes promises that are too good to believe at times. Then, some of those promises never become reality. At times, he has a way of telling people what they want to hear, what they want to believe. A negotiator that does not follow through on promises will lose his believability eventually. From there, he’ll lose the trust of those with whom he negotiates.

 

Using Bullying Tactics:

Just because you’re big doesn’t mean you should take advantage of people. Mr. Trump has boasted in the past about his ability to use other people’s money and resources to put deals together. Then, if the deal doesn’t bear fruit, he walks away leaving others holding the bag. If you acquire a reputation as a negotiator of leaving others holding the bag when troubles occur, they’ll avoid negotiating with you and you’ll miss potential opportunities that would have otherwise availed themselves. Always be mindful of how you treat the smallest and largest of people.

 

Danger:

When you lie, perceived to be unfair, and you leave some people feeling you don’t value them, eventually it’ll catch up with you. There will come a time when someone that negotiates tougher than you will seek to slay your negotiation efforts. They may do so as payback for the reputation you’ve established as being a ruthless negotiator, or simply to take your crown.

 

Agony:

The inherent agony in the way Mr. Trump negotiates is encased in his brand. That’s to say, he’s massaged his brand to a point that some people see him as a savior based on what his perceived accomplishments have been in business. They transfer those perceived skills as being viable in other realms of life (i.e. the presidency). The lesson to be observed from this dilemma is, you should negotiate with those that are more disposed to your influence than those that are not. By doing so, you stand a better chance of achieving more successful negotiation outcomes.

 

 

In your negotiations, be cautious when employing the strategies that Mr. Trump employs. He can get away with some of them, for now, because of who he is and the resources he has. You’re not him. So, if you’re wise, you won’t try these tactics at home or anywhere else. By not doing so … everything will be right with the world.

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Negotiation Psychology How To Win By Minding Your Mind” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

 

“The way you think determines the way you’ll act. Be mindful of what your mind thinks of to think and act better.” –Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Negotiation Psychology Minding Your Mind 

 

In a negotiation, psychology is everything. Negotiators strive to alter the mind of the other negotiator via the strategies they use. They do so for obvious reasons; they want to win, and thus they attempt to shift the mental perception of the other negotiator mind.

If you want to win more negotiations, you have to mind your mind, while altering the mindset of the opposing negotiator, by minding his mind too.

The following are thoughts you can use to shift the mindset of the person with whom you’re negotiating.

 

  1. Identify what’s important to the other negotiator.
  • You can accomplish this by asking, ‘what outcome are you seeking from this negotiation?’ To be more subtle, you can ask, ‘what would you like to see occur today?’ You’ll receive feedback. Then, as the negotiation progresses, see how far the other negotiator will go to achieve his stated outcome, and what he’s willing to concede to get it. This might be easier said than done, because he may ask for things that are unreasonable to see how much he can get. So, be careful to confirm what has been stated as being important, versus what you see in the form of the other negotiator’s actions. His actions will give you more insight than his words. Thus, always pay more attention to actions than words!

 

 

  1. Read his body language and you read his mind.
  • Some negotiators think, if someone has their arms crossed, they’re not open or receptive to an offer. Depending upon where you are in the negotiation process, that can be true or false. First, always establish the baseline of the other negotiator to determine how he uses his body in a ‘normal’ situation (whatever normal is for him). Then, compare what his normal body usage is to the changes he emits when he’s stressed, calm, contemplative, and/or reflective. As an example, if he’s jovial throughout the negotiation and makes gestures with his hands up and open, take note when his hands are turned down and he’s pulling his gestures towards himself. The latter could denote a shift in his paradigm. Depending on how such might influence the negotiation, you should take an appropriate action to align his mind with your thoughts.

 

  1. Use microexpressions to identify real thoughts and emotions.
  • Microexpressions are mental displays of emotion that are unfiltered by the mind before they’re displayed. They last for no more than one second. Since the mind does not filter the action before it’s committed, the display you see is real. There are 7 micro-expressions that are generic to everyone on the planet. They are, fear, anger, disgust, surprise, contempt, happiness, and sadness. I’ll use ‘disgust’ as an example of how you might use a microexpression to validate a gesture you observe. When disgust is exhibited, the exhibitor will appear to have his upper lip raised towards his nose as though something doesn’t smell right. Through that action, he’s telling you that your offer doesn’t appeal to him. Take note that he may display the same signs when making an offer if he doesn’t think you’ll accept it, or know it’s not a good offer. In such case, he may be testing you to see how you’ll react to his offer.

 

There are many psychological insights one can glean and use to alter the other negotiator’s mind during a negotiation. The better adept you become at using the above suggestions, the greater your negotiation outcomes will be … and everything will be right with the world.

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

 

 

 

 

Continue...

Posted by Greg Williams in Uncategorized, Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

“How To Read Microexpressions To Win More Negotiations”

 

“Possessing the ability to detect microexpressions is like being a mind reader.” –Greg Williams, The Master Negotiator & Body Language Expert

 

Read Microexpressions To Win More Negotiations

Click here to get, “Body Language Secrets To Win More Negotiations”

 

“How To Read Microexpressions To Win More Negotiations”

 

Did you see that? That was a microexpression. Do you read microexpressions in your negotiations?

Microexpressions are unfiltered displays of emotion that occur in less than 1 second. They reveal a negotiator’s mindset, which can be used to strengthen a negotiator’s position if he correctly decodes them. Since your opponent’s brain does not have the opportunity to interrupt the display before it’s made, the microexpression discloses the person’s real thoughts, emotions, and feelings. Thus, body language can give us away based on the nonverbal signals we send in the form of microexpressions. In essence, a negotiator is not thinking about how he’ll respond, he just responds.

The seven universal microexpressions that are generic to everyone are fear, anger, disgust, surprise, contempt, sadness and happiness.

 

Fear

Fear is denoted when you raise your eyebrows, open your eyes widely, and slightly stretch or open your lips. Your bottom lip protrudes downward.

When we are fearful of something the reason the eyes widen is because we want to see as much of the environment as possible. In so doing we are able to make decisions based on everything we’re able to glean so we can determine what we should do next.

 

Anger

An angry person has her eyebrows down and together. You will see her glaring, narrowing her lips and flaring her nostrils. You get the message that she is literally glaring at you; she is not happy with either what you’ve done, or something you said.

Keep in mind that her eyebrows would be raised if she sensed fear and lowered when angry. Therein lies the slight way you can differentiate between the two microexpressions.

 

Disgust

Disgust is conveyed by lifting the upper lip, almost like if your opponent smelled something foul and he is wrinkling his nose from it. That’s an easy way to detect disgust. His microexpression displays he does not like what he is hearing or sensing.

 

Surprise

Surprise is conveyed with raised eyebrows, wide eyes and open mouth. You’ll recall that you can convey fear with raised eyebrows and wide eyes. Fear and surprise have that in common. The open mouth does not necessarily have to be a part of surprise, but you will usually see the raised eyebrows and the wide eyes.

How do you differentiate between the microexpressions of fear and surprise? You watch for more signals when you are not sure what your opponent is displaying. Look for clusters of expressions to validate what you’re seeing.

 

Contempt

Contempt is communicated by a sneer; the opponent raises one corner of her lip on one side of her face. Remember these expressions last for less than a second, so you have to be very observant to note exactly what is occurring. Then confirm what has just happened by asking probing questions.

 

Sadness

With sadness the upper eyelids appear to be drooping. The eyes are unfocused. The lips are slightly turned down and you will hear a change in tone.  Your nonverbal microexpression and your tone are combined to project sadness.

 

Happiness

A happy person has a wide-eyed expression – smiles, elevated cheeks, and wide eyes. You’re displaying the gaiety you’re feeling, perhaps at the end of a successful negotiation.

 

If you’d like to train yourself to recognize microexpressions, act the way you would normally act if you were experiencing the seven universal microexpressions and note your facial features. In so doing you’ll become more astute at recognizing microexpressions at the negotiation table. That will give you greater insight per what the other negotiator is thinking at critical times in the negotiation. That information will prove to be invaluable to you … and everything will be right with the world.

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , ,

Negotiation Infographic Tip “Body Language Secrets To Win More Negotiations”

 

Do you want to discover how to increase all aspects of your life? Yes, I do mean all aspects of your life! Then, you need to discover how to read body language and uncover the meaning of hidden signals that impact the way you feel, interact, and deal with other people.

You can gain such insight in …

 

Body Language Secrets To Win More Negotiations

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Negotiation Infographic Tip and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Negotiation Nodes – Negotiator Personality Types

 

 

Negotiate better by understanding the personality type of the person with

whom you’re negotiating based on the mindset that person possesses. 

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The Negotiation Nodes Negotiator Personality Types

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Social Media and Negoiating, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Negotiation Infographic Tip and tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Eyes – Gain Hidden Negotiation Insights By Reading Body Language

 

Here’s how you can gain greater meaning and gain hidden negotiation insights by reading the eyes of someone’s body language.

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Eyes Gain Hidden Negotiation Insight By Reading Body Language

 

 

 

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Posted by Greg Williams in Uncategorized, Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Micro Expressions, Emotional Intelligence, Negotiation Psychology, Negotiation Infographic Tip and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“How To Win More Negotiations By Using Micro Expressions”

 

Seven Universal Micro Expressions

 

Do you know how to win negotiations by using micro expressions? Are you aware that savvy negotiators detect your micro expressions to give them an edge over you when they negotiate? Would you like to know what micro expressions are, their characteristics, and how you can use them to enhance your negotiations?

This article identifies the seven universal micro expressions that are germane to everyone on the planet. It also outlines how to detect and use them to win more negotiations.

 

First, micro expressions are displays of emotion that last no more than one second. Second, the emotional expression occurs before the brain has a chance to filter the display. Third, micro expressions are a momentary glimpse into the ‘real’ thoughts of the person displaying them. Thus, by recognizing them you know exactly what that person is thinking per an offer you or he made.

 

The seven universal micro expressions are (i.e. universal means someone in North America would react the same as someone in Asia, Europe, etc.):

Fear (eyebrows raised, wide eyes, lips slightly stretched & parted, bottom lip protruding downward)

Anger (eyebrows down and together, eyes glaring, narrowing of the lips)

Disgust (lifting of the upper lip, scrunching of the nose)

Surprise (raised eyebrows, wide eyes, open mouth)

Contempt (one side of the lip raised on one side of the face)

Sadness (upper eyelids drooping, eyes unfocused, lips slightly turned down)

Happiness (crow’s feet wrinkle around eyes, cheeks elevated, eye orbit muscle movement)

 

Now that you’re aware of what the seven universal micro expressions are and their characteristics, let’s look at how you can use them to gain an advantage in a negotiation. Remember, they last no more than one second. Thus, you must be astute at observing them. They’re very fleeting.

 

Scenario: You’re negotiating with Phil and he’s being very coy about the offer you have on the table. You sense he likes the offer, but you’re not really sure. To test your assumptions and his perspective you state, “I’m sorry. That’s my best offer”. Then, you get up from the negotiation table as though to exit. As you do, you observe that he has raised eyebrows and his eyes have widened. You know your tactic has had an effect on him. What you have to determine, since the raised eyebrows and widened eyes are traits displayed by someone experiencing fear or surprise is what else you observed. If you also saw Phil’s bottom lip protruding downward, you know he’s fearful or have apprehensions about possibly losing the deal. You accurately read his micro expression to gain that insight. At bare minimum, you now know he was bluffing with the stance he’d projected prior. With that, you also know you have a stronger position from which to negotiate.

 

As you can see, micro expressions give insights into the thoughts of someone’s mind, which means you can observe what they’re really thinking per an offer or counteroffer you make. With that insight, you then know to what degree you can pursue the course you’re on or modify your position in the negotiation. With that kind of insight, micro expressions become your hidden ally. Thus, when you become astute at recognizing and using micro expression, you’ll win more negotiations … and everything will be right with the world.

 

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

 

 

Continue...

Posted by Greg Williams in Body Language and Physiognomics, Strategies for Successful Negotiations, Negotiation Tips, Difficult Negotiations & Conflict Resolution, Micro Expressions, Negotiation Psychology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,